Designer Edibles 1: Peas (Pisum sativum ‘Meteor’)

I’m on a mission to grow as many different species and varieties of plants as possible to help with my RHS Level 2 studies. While I am drawn to plants that look good for a designer look, I also want to grow some vegetables, but to fit into our garden, that means they need to have style. So I’m going to start this ‘Designer edibles’ series to highlight veg I’ve grown that is also ornamental, fitting in with a beautiful design. Continue reading Designer Edibles 1: Peas (Pisum sativum ‘Meteor’)

Brunnera macrophylla ‘Mr Morse’

Brunnera macrophylla 'Mr Morse'

The plants are still small (they’ve seriously been through the wars after arriving near death!), so the flowers are too, but the Brunnera macrophylla ‘Mr Morse’ is everything I hoped it would be. A much rarer, near identical plant to ‘Jack Frost’ but fit for a spring white garden. Now I’ve seen them in person, I maintain the white flowers are better than the blue 😉

Pot’s Growing On: 1st April and spring is well underway

Call me a total plant nerd, but Lupin leaves are pretty darn cool
Call me a total plant nerd, but Lupin leaves are pretty darn cool

After about a year of planning for our garden this year, we’re now able to get started on making it reality – I can’t think of many things better than seeing lots of it coming to life.

The last couple of weeks have seen everything in the garden spring into action. From the birds making nests to the plants shooting.

For future reference, on the 1st of April, this is what was growing:

  • Astilbe are shooting like gangbusters, going from little shoots to the first signs of spreading leaves in only a week.
  • Most of the perennials are now growing again, although only the first leaves are breaking
  • The plum tree is on the brink of flowering, one or two flowers are now open
  • The Acanthus spinosus is growing and the weird clumpy leaves that were sitting there all winter that I thought might be a disease are actually the start of the flower stalks – hooray!
  • All of the climbers and shrubs are now breaking their buds. The new Clematis viticella ‘Polish Spirit’ is growing seriously quickly now. And the Clematis ‘Avalanche’ out front is growing flower buds fast.
  • Inside, all of the seedlings seem to be doing well and are growing nicely. I’ll definitely wait until the 1st of March before sowing next year – just couldn’t help myself in Feb this year 😉 Interestingly, my little experiment of lightbox vs window has proven that a lightbox has grown seedlings almost double the size so far…
  • The five divisions I made of Heuchera ‘Licorice’ last autumn are now all growing well. Some have stronger roots than others but the leaf growth is very healthy. It’s a very beautiful plant on mass and I’m looking forward to its airy white flowers again.

So, here in Clapham at least, it seems March is the turning point, but by April 1st the race is on!

One last thing, I’m really interested in the storage organs of plants now I understand a bit about how plants work. Last year our Eryngium planum didn’t flower at all. Today I moved one, which you’re not supposed to do because the roots are fragile and deep and indeed I did snap some roots. But what I couldn’t believe was how big the main tap root had become – fat and enormous! No wonder it didn’t flower last year, it was growing that beast underground. I expect, even with the root snapping earlier, that this year it will almost certainly flower well.

Pot’s Growing on in March 2015? Keeping seedlings alive and watching the world come to life

With the spring equinox (and a non-existent cloud hidden solar eclipse) done and dusted, Clapham is noticeably exploding into growth right now. The little propagation station we have set up in the front, south west facing bay window is working wonders…

Ricinus communis 'Carmenchita' growing strong
Ricinus communis ‘Carmenchita’ growing strong

Ricinus communis ‘Carmenchita’ from Sarah Raven not only have beautiful big (but poisonous) seeds, their germination is a wonderful thing to behold. Slow and primeval, a red stalk slowly drags the large cotyledons out of the soil, like an umbilical cord / crane over the course of two weeks.

The Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherry Brandy’ seems to be doing well with most now growing their second or third true leaves. Both the grasses, Briza media and Lagurus ovatus are doing well. Unfortunately, the second batch of Solenostemon scuttelarioides after seemingly escaping damping off, after being pricked out, some have developed what looks like the start of the disease and growth slowed 🙁 I’m suspecting a dodgy batch of seeds as I sterilised the growing media to kingdom come! I’ll try again in the summer.

Vicia faba 'Aquadulce Claudia' flowers
Vicia faba ‘Aquadulce Claudia’ flowers

Down in my raised bed at the local community garden, even though my broad beans and peas were early cropping varieties, I was surprised to find them this week completely covered in flowers. I’ve been advised to pollinate them as there might not be enough bees around yet. Though I’m not sure how really… eek.

My raised bed has suddenly sprung into action in the growing warmth and light. It has been very dry recently here though.
My raised bed has suddenly sprung into action in the growing warmth and light. It has been very dry recently here though.

Around the area, signs of spring are everywhere, with local Magnolia buds bursting, daffodils here, there and everywhere, and the leaf buds on trees and shrubs all splitting with green shining through.

It all feels like a long time coming, but suddenly, all planned planting needs to happen right now! I’m so excited. Last year at this time I knew nothing. I had no ‘favourite’ plants. Now, in my second proper gardening year, I know quite a bit more yet there’s so much still to find out, learn and explore.

Germination!

Well, I have to hand it to the Garland Super7 Heated propagator. Everything I sow on there germinates within a few days (except Verbena bonariensis which I know can have a slow germination). Above you can see the Lupinus nanus ‘Snow Pixie’ exploding out of the compost after I only planted them on Sunday afternoon! 48 hours and they’re ten times the size of their seed. In addition, the Lagurus ovatus have germinated too. As have some of the Ricinus communis. All three are from Sarah Raven so credit there as well. 

Spring has arrived in Clapham!

Spring definitely hit Clapham this week with days of sun and temperatures high enough to be outside without a coat. Plants are showing it too as buds are swelling up and some bursting into flower…

Helleborus 'Ivory Prince' now almost fully in flower and looking better than last year
Helleborus ‘Ivory Prince’ now almost fully in flower and looking better than last year
Temporary spring window boxes are still going strong

This week I’ve sown seeds for:

  • Lupinus nanus ‘Snow Pixie’ to go in the front window boxes in summer
  • Lagurus ovatus, the lovely ‘Bunny Tail’ grass, also for the front window boxes
  • Briza media, a grass for the main herbaceous border out back
  • Tropaeolum minus ‘Phoenix’ (I’m refusing to call them Nasturtium – I want to give them a fresh lease of life! 🙂 ) – I planted all 25 seeds and plan to only use those that flower red.
  • Phaseolus vulgaris ‘Amethyst’ in my community garden veg plot – I also plan to grow some of these in the ornamental herbaceous border because they will look quite unusual
  • Allium cepa ‘White Lisbon’, or spring onion, in the veg plot too

Don’t hate me for using Latin names, I’m not being pretentious, I just need to use them at every opportunity to memorise for my RHS course!

Otherwise, it’s all fairly positive news at the moment as the last sowing I made is all growing nicely in the front living room rather than the damping off inducing light box in the bathroom. I’m double sterilising the growing media which seems to have worked too – I bought a new pack as well, incase the other pack was the problem.

My plan is to grow the seedlings in the front room to a good size, then move them to the light box once big enough to have passed the damping off stage. In particular, the second batch of Solenostemon scuttelarioides, Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherry Brandy’ and Solanum lycopersicum ‘Vilma’ (or Tomatoes!) are all now showing their second true leaves.

My little veg bed in the community garden already has Vicia faba 'Aquadulce Claudia' in flower
My little veg bed in the community garden already has Vicia faba ‘Aquadulce Claudia’ in flower
Wildlife in Clapham... (sort of)
Wildlife in Clapham… (sort of)

Out in the garden it’s been fantastic weather and I was delighted to see bees and hover flies buzzing around the garden today. I also came across a few centipedes which I’m told are beneficial insects. Spring has definitely arrived.

Jobs wise, I’ve added some new willow canes for the Clematis viticella ‘Polish Spirit’. Planted a Parthenocissus henryana against the north shaded fence to grow up that. And I’ve moved a few of the perennials, including the Alchemilla mollis ‘Thriller’ which I divided into three. Although let me tell you, what a beast! I had to literally hack it apart with a saw in the end. It was one tough cookie.

Finally, I received my order of three Begonias from Dibley’s Nursery who exhibit at many of the RHS events. Their Begonias are just stunning and my three young plants already look as quirky as I’d hoped. Having never owned or grown a Begonia before, here’s hoping I keep the things alive!!

I've received my order of Begonias from Dibley's nursery - very exciting! All three plants are very unusual. Will share more when they're growing well.
I’ve received my order of Begonias from Dibley’s nursery – very exciting! All three plants are very unusual. Will share more when they’re growing well.

 

Big Dreams, Small Spaces: Victorian inspiration

Driven by a renewed love of plants and a brain being filled with RHS knowledge, in 2014 I designed a mico-Victorian themed garden. Allowing me to stuff our plot to the rafters (branches?) with a living collection of varied and beautiful things. But we needed help, which is where Monty Don and Big Dreams, Small Spaces stepped in. Continue reading Big Dreams, Small Spaces: Victorian inspiration

Dividing a Zamioculcas zamiifolia (ZZ plant)

I’ve had a Zamioculcas zamiifolia for some years now. In the last year, I found the magic formula and – despite rumours it is a slow growing plant – it has been growing like a rocket. So much so, it had outgrown our small flat with a further ten large leaves starting to grow! I felt adventurous and decided to divide it, putting some of my new RHS Level 2 (unit 4 Plant Propagation thank you very much!) knowledge to the test. Continue reading Dividing a Zamioculcas zamiifolia (ZZ plant)

Sowing seeds, planting clematis and pruning

Today Rumbles was doing cartwheels in the garden trying to catch a fly – the most activity he’s done in months. If that isn’t a sign that spring is on its way, then the plants all creaking into a slow growth is.

White Viola above the white Tulips are starting to flower - the Tulips are starting to sprout through too
White Viola above the white Tulips are starting to flower – the Tulips are starting to sprout through too
Helleborus x hybridus 'Ivory Prince' is finally opening its large flowers (not sure what the little black marks are...)
Helleborus x hybridus ‘Ivory Prince’ is finally opening its large flowers (not sure what the little black marks are…) – I love this plant
A few of the Galanthus survived the year and have flowered! I've put down copious amounts of fertiliser in a bid to grow their number of 2016. Does anyone know what type of Snowdrop this is?
A few of the Galanthus survived the year and have flowered! I’ve put down copious amounts of fertiliser in a bid to grow their number for 2016.
Does anyone know what type of Snowdrop this is?
Front window area still looking good. The Clematis has some serious numbers of buds emerging now. Hoorah!
Front window area still looking good. The Clematis has some serious numbers of buds emerging now. Hoorah!
And we're off! Verbena bonariensis, Rubeckia hirta 'Cherry Brandy', Ricinus communis 'Carmenchita', Tomato Vilma and Basil 'Sweet Green', the Sweetpeas and Coleus - oh, and you can see the extra flower coming on the Hippeastrum
And we’re off! Verbena bonariensis, Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherry Brandy’, Ricinus communis ‘Carmenchita’, Tomato Vilma and Basil ‘Sweet Green’, the Sweetpeas and Coleus – oh, and you can see the extra flower coming on the Hippeastrum

This week I’ve also hard pruned the Buddleja davidii ‘Santana’ and given a very heavy prune to the Choisya – I felt bad doing the Choisya as we’ll miss the flowers and it’s a bit early to do it, but it had seriously outgrown its space.

Plus, moved an Astrantia, dug up some Astrantia seedlings by accident (doh!) and planted out both of the new Clematis. Gave the new Rose ‘Mme Legras de St. Germain’ a sprinkly of Blood, Fish and Bone as it is shooting away now.

Littlebury Gardens in January

IMG_0260I’m not sure how but it’s almost the end of January! The weather has been very mild this winter and a few plants in Littlebury Gardens are still growing, albeit at a creeping pace. The Buddleja davidii, Sambucus nigra and Brunnera macrophylla have lost most of their old leaves but the new ones seem to be growing just fine.

Under our plum tree some Galanthus (assume nivalis) I planted without thinking 15 months ago are showing their heads and are about to flower. Disappointingly without expanding the crop – this year I’ve added lots of fertiliser granules to see if I can get them to multiply.

The large Helleborus ‘Ivory Prince’ is budding up spectacularly, as is one of the three random Hellebores I bought at the local Clapham Fayre in the summer. Out front, the three vines we have in pots – Jasminum officinale, Lonicera japonica ‘Halliana’ and Clematis x cartmanii hort. ‘Avalanche’ are acting like winter has barely happened. The Clematis in particular is now budding up, despite a year of damaged foliage and I’ve started giving it a full strength diluted potassium fertiliser.

The fruits of my planning and plotting are arriving through the post including a rather outrageous amount of seeds (some in the pic above!) I’m itching to get planting but am holding back until mid-February as a reward for focussing on and completing my RHS Level 2 exams. And because that’s the best time to plant some of them (inside) of course!

I have snuck on a batch of Solenostemon though, 15 seeds. Couldn’t help myself. Planted this week in a heated propagator. I wasn’t a big fan of Solenostemon / Coleus until I saw a display at RHS Wisely in 2014. Some of them were quite remarkable. I bought a pack of, what I think, are the most interesting plants from Thompson & Morgan.

I also took receipt this week of an Aeonium arboreum ‘Schwartzkopf’ which is supposed to be a dark purple, almost black rosetted succulent. However, the one I received from eBay (never again!!) is merely a stick with speckles of possible regrowth. Fingers crossed.

Muehlenbeckia axillaris - finally confirmed! And the little cutting is growing well.
Muehlenbeckia axillaris – finally confirmed! And the little cutting is growing well.

Today, prompted by an offer on Thorncroft Clematis, I also finally ordered two late flowering purple Clematis. Clematis viticella ‘Polish Spirit’ which I’ve been looking at for months and a Clematis viticella Galore Evipo032. The Galore was an impromptu purchase of a £5 offer.

Yesterday I also took the plunge and bought three more Dahlias. *gulp* that takes the total to 20…) Three dwarf white ‘Gallery Art Fair’ for the front window boxes.

Otherwise, January has purely been about revising for my first batch of RHS Level 2 exams. The knowledge is sinking in now, but blimey, the sheer volume of information to memorise is mind blowing. Whoever says horticulture and botany is easy (*cough* David Cameron *cough*) I dare to take this course and pass. It’s hugely fun and rewarding however and I’ve learnt so much ready for my 2015 gardening year.

Oh, while I remember, two amazing things have happened: i) the Buxus cuttings I planted on a whim last summer have only bloomin rooted! Thick, strong roots. I was really excited about those. Perhaps my topiary from scratch dream will one day happen. ii) I finally discovered that the cutting I nicked and planted from down the road is Muehlenbeckia axillaris (right) – I’ve been trying to find that one out for about 7 months! Loads of places sell it, but nowhere labels the flpping thing. Now I know what it is, I can plant it safely. I think it’s fairly common (though I’ve rarely seen it) and considered something akin to Ivy as a bit of a thug, but having seen it used wisely I think it’s one of the most beautiful ground cover or climbers there is.

Littlebury 2014 Flower Power

2014 was my experimental year in the garden. While everything certainly wasn’t very cohesive, there were a lot of flowers given our tiny plot! It all turned out much pinker than I expected…

Clematis x cartmanii hort. 'Avalanche'
Clematis x cartmanii hort. ‘Avalanche’
Hyacinth mini flower forest time
Hyacinth mini flower forest time
Spring crocus' flowering already because the weather was so mild
Spring crocus’ flowering already because the weather was so mild
IMG_0043
Cyclamen
Echinacea purpurea 'Fatal attraction'
Echinacea purpurea ‘Fatal attraction’
IMG_0041
Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’
Spathiphyllum (Peace Lily)
Spathiphyllum (Peace Lily)
Cacti
Cacti pot
IMG_2701
Fuchsia ‘Jack Stanway’

 

Fuchsia Hawkshead
Fuchsia Hawkshead
Sambucus nigra black lace
Sambucus nigra black lace
Allysum
Allysum
Fuchsia Golden Treasure
Fuchsia Golden Treasure
Kniphofia, turned out yellow rather than orange / red
Kniphofia, turned out yellow rather than orange / red
Buddleia proving it's a butterfly bush
Buddleja proving it’s a butterfly bush
Hosta Francee
Hosta Francee
Brachyscome August cut back hard
Brachyscome August cut back hard
IMG_1394
Viburnum tinus
IMG_1388
Helleborus x hybridus ‘Ivory Prince’

 

Monarda Cambridge Scarlet
Monarda Cambridge Scarlet
Schlumbergera
Schlumbergera

Hyacinths

Up until this year Hyacinths were a massive no no for me. Too blousy and old fashioned. But looking for things to do in the winter I planted some and I’m going to change my tune. I think they are beautiful and their fragrance is lovely. If carefully planted they can look contemporary too. Here are my indoor Jan Bos plants:

10 favourite plants of 2014

It’s the last day of 2014 and I’ve been really interested in plants this year (no sh*t Sherlock) and at the start of the year I really struggled to identify even one plant that I really liked. A year later, and I still don’t have a huge list of favourites yet. However! There are a handful that have planted themselves in my head as essential picks. Read on to find out what they are… Continue reading 10 favourite plants of 2014

Studying RHS Level 2 Principles of Horticulture

At one point during my emo self-obsessing teenage years I was convinced I was stupid. Then one day I realised I wasn’t stupid, I was just plain ignorant! Ignorance was indeed bliss because you can change ignorance, you can’t change stupidity. So I changed my ignorance.

Fast forward a bit and below is a photo of my view right at this minute. Twelve years since I last had to study for an exam, recreating the exact same multi-coloured highlighter pen mess of papers on the living room floor…

The last time I was doing this was over ten years ago and I was staring dumbstruck at the TV as the second plane hit the Twin Towers
The last time I was doing this was over ten years ago and I was staring dumbstruck at the TV as the second plane hit the Twin Towers

Continue reading Studying RHS Level 2 Principles of Horticulture

Tip toeing in the footsteps of Darwin at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Snuck in…

This weekend I spent two fun and informative days at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh with a bunch of fellow gardeners studying the RHS Level 2 Certificate in the Principles of Horticulture. I have so many thoughts buzzing around my head now that I’m going to chuck a few things down here in a bit of a garbled blog post to record it. Continue reading Tip toeing in the footsteps of Darwin at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Shovelling sh*t while the plants still go at it!

October is almost over, so here’s a diary of what’s been going on in Littlebury gardens to refer back to next year.

The month started fairly mild, but has been wet and the weather has now finally gone cold (reaching -8 degrees at night by the 21st). Which is fantastic news because the Vine Weevil menace should now withdraw until next year! The neighbours will think me less mad as I won’t be going out at night with a torch. For now.

Our friend Ian helped us shift a load of soil and rubble to the tip at the weekend, which meant we could bring in a load of muck to improve the soil and mulch around some plants. I’ve been weirdly excited about improving the soil. Job done.

Clapham Common - sunny but cold morning, leaves dropping off all trees now
Clapham Common – sunny but cold morning, leaves dropping off all trees now
Wandsworth Town community garden still looks amazing
Wandsworth Town community garden still looks amazing
Our Garden on the 22nd Oct
Our Garden on the 22nd Oct
A load of old shit, literally. Manure for a mulch!
A load of old shit, literally. Manure for a mulch!
Salvia 'Raspberry Royale'
Salvia ‘Raspberry Royale’
Salvia ‘Maraschino’ – these both look so neon, they’ll be perfect next year as they are clearly strong flowerers
One of the ferns looking good - this one appears to deter slugs
One of the ferns looking good – this one appears to deter slugs
Spring crocus' flowering already because the weather was so mild
Spring crocus’ flowering already because the weather was so mild
Berries on next door's trees
Berries on next door’s trees
Winter and spring pots at the ready
Winter and spring pots at the ready
The Lavender and Rosemary did better than I thought they would. The Cornus kousa var 'Chinensis' is starting to drop its leaves. Brunnera macrophylla 'Mr Morse' is doing better out of its pot.
The Lavender and Rosemary did better than I thought they would. The Cornus kousa var ‘Chinensis’ is starting to drop its leaves. Brunnera macrophylla ‘Mr Morse’ is doing better out of its pot.
Hart's tongue fern and the Dryopteris look OK - must catch the slugs before they do the damage next year
Hart’s tongue fern and the Dryopteris look OK – must catch the slugs before they do the damage next year
If the Salvias can do this from a cutting in just one month in autumn, in summer next year they will be incredible
If the Salvias can do this from a cutting in just one month in autumn, in summer next year they will be incredible
I didn't expect to grow anything down here! But it's done really well
I didn’t expect to grow anything down here! But it’s done really well
For some reason, everything does really well in this small shady bed. The fern is a bit cat trodden on and slug eaten, but otherwise, the Hellebore from a Clapham fete is doing really well, so is the other division of a Brunnera 'Mr Morse' - bring on the spring white / fresh garden!
For some reason, everything does really well in this small shady bed. The fern is a bit cat trodden on and slug eaten, but otherwise, the Hellebore from a Clapham fete is doing really well, so is the other division of a Brunnera ‘Mr Morse’ – bring on the spring white / fresh garden!
This shady pot area is doing alright. The Fuchsia 'Hawksheads' have come on well despite looking a bit dodgy mid summer, and the ferns are, unbelievably, doing really well in that scrap of soil. Some bright orange and red violas just for fun this year.
This shady pot area is doing alright. The Fuchsia ‘Hawksheads’ have come on well despite looking a bit dodgy mid summer, and the ferns are, unbelievably, doing really well in that scrap of soil. Some bright orange and red violas just for fun this year.
The Cordylines seem to be much happier now it's cooler and wetter. The Astilbes have looked a bit dodgy all summer - perhaps our garden is too dry. Otherwise, the Brunnera is doing well here too, as is the other Hellebore, fern. While the Echineceas are shutting down.
The Cordylines seem to be much happier now it’s cooler and wetter. The Astilbes have looked a bit dodgy all summer – perhaps our garden is too dry. Otherwise, the Brunnera is doing well here too, as is the other Hellebore, fern. While the Echineceas are shutting down.
Who knew that a mulch could make everything look so much tidier! That Hebe (while I love it) is going next year, its flowers are too pastel. If you want it, let me know, it is quite stunning.
Who knew that a mulch could make everything look so much tidier! That Hebe (while I love it) is going next year, its flowers are too pastel. If you want it, let me know, it is quite stunning.
The Monarda 'Cambridge scarlet' managed a couple of flowers this year but otherwise seemed to be doing badly. However, in the last two months it has sprouted loads of off shoots. I'll have to keep a check on its spread but hopefully this is a sign of a better display in 2015.
The Monarda ‘Cambridge scarlet’ managed a couple of flowers this year but otherwise seemed to be doing badly. However, in the last two months it has sprouted loads of off shoots. I’ll have to keep a check on its spread but hopefully this is a sign of a better display in 2015.
The Kniphofia, like the Monarda, managed one flower and did little else until now where it seems to be growing more strongly. Perhaps more water in summer.
The Kniphofia, like the Monarda, managed one flower and did little else until now where it seems to be growing more strongly. Perhaps more water in summer.
No flowers from the Acanthus spinosus this year but it's grown loads (I did plant it quite late in early summer). Expect a good display in 2015.
No flowers from the Acanthus spinosus this year but it’s grown loads (I did plant it quite late in early summer). Expect a good display in 2015.
Fatsia japonica is coming into flower now - it's quite overgrown and a sun hogger, so will probably cut right back to ground level next year to make more manageable (and protect more from snails!)
Fatsia japonica is coming into flower now – it’s quite overgrown and a sun hogger, so will probably cut right back to ground level next year to make more manageable (and protect more from snails!)
Sambucus niger has grown well this year. Will cut right back in spring to help it bush out more.
Sambucus niger has grown well this year. Will cut right back in spring to help it bush out more.
The cyclamen look great but I think have become too waterlogged as they appear to be dying back in bits. Either that, or the Vine Weevils laid their evil eggs and the larvae are munching the roots.
The cyclamen look great but I think have become too waterlogged as they appear to be dying back in bits. Either that, or the Vine Weevils laid their evil eggs and the larvae are munching the roots.
Inside, the Schlumberga is budding up after good growth in the summer. This'll be it's third flowery Christmas!
Inside, the Schlumberga is budding up after good growth in the summer. This’ll be it’s third flowery Christmas!

Chelsea Physic Garden in Autumn

Today I made the most of my new Royal Horticultural Society membership and visited the Chelsea Physic Garden next to the Thames. It’s a living, breathing museum and really does feel like that – it’s the most outdoors museum I’ve been to, complete with labels and educational messaging next to every ‘exhibit’. If you want to know where aspirin comes from, you can actually see and touch the plant right here. Continue reading Chelsea Physic Garden in Autumn

It’s October and it’s still warm! Bulb planting and drain pipe trellis time

What’s going on with the weather? Although it’s dark by about 6.30pm now, it’s still sunny and very hot in the day time. Not that I’m really complaining, but I wouldn’t mind a frost to start killing off the pests and diseases.

Echinacea purpurea 'Fatal attraction'
Echinacea purpurea ‘Fatal attraction’

Continue reading It’s October and it’s still warm! Bulb planting and drain pipe trellis time

landscape and garden design in Clapham, London

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