Allotment Month 17: dahlias, prairie and produce

It’s year two for my allotment and the layout I created for it originally is really working. The beds have been easy to keep weed free with weed suppressant membrane and rotating crops is a doddle. Everything is planted in little rows in a simple structure, the paths have nice grass along them now. With each weekend it’s all starting to feel neater and a step closer to how I want it.  Continue reading Allotment Month 17: dahlias, prairie and produce

7 easy pickings for grow your own keenos

I’m being thrown head first heading into my second season on the allotment and this year, my mind has turned to my stomach. Quite a different mindset to last year’s “must grow everything possible! Yay!” approach. I’ve actually come up with the below formula to decide what to grow, which I thought would be helpful to share: Continue reading 7 easy pickings for grow your own keenos

Marrakesh (Part Four): Jardin Majorelle

Jardin Majorelle is best known today for being owned by Yves Saint Lauren, who famously saved it in the 1980s from both disrepair and developers building a hotel on the site. It was made however by a French artist called Jacques Majorelle who began creating this unique garden and house in the 1940s. Continue reading Marrakesh (Part Four): Jardin Majorelle

Marrakesh (Part Three): Islamic tiled courtyards at Bahia Palace

The second oldest garden we visited was by far the most visually arresting of designs. It is immaculate and inspirational. Yet it is marred by a multifaceted dark past which I find hard to ignore. Built around 1867, you will never forget a visit to the beautiful Bahia Palace. Continue reading Marrakesh (Part Three): Islamic tiled courtyards at Bahia Palace

Marrakesh (Part Two): blown away by ancient Islamic garden design at the El Badi Palace

I’ve wanted to visit Marrakesh for about ten years, drawn by its bright colours. What I hadn’t appreciated is its rich gardening culture, as popular today as it was in the city’s ancient past. The oldest garden we visited on our trip was that of the five hundred year old El Badi Palace next to the Riad Badi in which we stayed. It’s enormous. Continue reading Marrakesh (Part Two): blown away by ancient Islamic garden design at the El Badi Palace

Crossrail Place Roof Garden, Canary Wharf

At the weekend my Instagram buddy lamaisonbleue tipped me off to the fact the Crossrail Place Roof Garden at Canary Wharf had opened. Despite the construction of this £500 million station being heavily featured on TV (for its genius balances and weights to deal with changing temperatures in weather) I’d somehow missed its grand unveiling. Chris and I rushed to the scene on Sunday to check it out.  Continue reading Crossrail Place Roof Garden, Canary Wharf

Allotment: weed suppressant membrane – beating weeds organically

Month 13: my allotment has expanded a bit this year as I’ve taken on some unused adjacent plot. This is thick with grass and other weeds so I’m using weed suppressant membrane to bring it under control with less effort. It may not look pretty, but it works. Continue reading Allotment: weed suppressant membrane – beating weeds organically

Landscape design at Stowe Garden in Buckinghamshire

Back in November Chris and I had the opportunity to spend a sunny Autumn afternoon at Stowe in Buckinghamshire (a short drive from where I grew up). I can’t say we fell in love with the place but it’s an interesting exercise in seeing and experiencing first-hand the fundamental building blocks of landscape garden design. Continue reading Landscape design at Stowe Garden in Buckinghamshire

The best potatoes to grow

Last year I grew a set of seven different potato cultivars and only really liked one of them, ‘Jazzy’. So, tonight I asked my Twitter buddies which potatoes they recommend and I was inundated with amazing suggestions! There are some clear winners, namely ‘Charlotte’ which everyone recommended and ‘Anya’ / ‘Pink Fir Apple’. Below is the full list with links to the Twitter accounts of those who recommended them. Continue reading The best potatoes to grow

44 Future gardening moments of 2016

Future gardening is the phrase I use to describe my personal take on the world. Be forward thinking. Be big thinking. Looking at gardening and garden design with a serious eye to combine humans and nature in a way that suits both. Sustainable, enjoyable, beautiful, progressive. My future gardening journey to date has been organic in its perambulations, with many great gardeners helping and inspiring me. I have much to do in 2017 but at this time of year I like to pause and reflect on the moments from the recent past (small things and big things) that will no doubt influence my garden designs in future. It’s been a fun year, so below is a mini diary of 44 moments that meant a lot to me personally in 2016. Continue reading 44 Future gardening moments of 2016

December: Hellebores, cat grass, sweet peas, ferns and shooting alliums

It’s almost Christmas so I’m crazy busy wrapping up work, getting ready for the family arriving and trying to revise for my next RHS exams in February. There’s still time to squeeze in the odd few essential jobs in our small urban garden in central London though. Continue reading December: Hellebores, cat grass, sweet peas, ferns and shooting alliums

My Tiny Indoor Garden by Lia Leendertz

Earlier in the year Lia Leendertz and Mark Diacono popped over to talk about and photograph our indoor plants for their new book My Tiny Indoor Garden. I loved the idea of houseplants being seen as a ‘garden’ because that’s really what they are. For years of renting in London they were the only garden I had. Having always been a little book worm, to have our houseplants – some with great personal meaning to me – featured in such a book feels very special indeed. Others featured include stunning cacti in the London shop called Prick, a porch of succulents to put other collections to shame, a perfect collection of plants owned by the current curator of RHS Wisley and some ruins enclosed within a tropical glasshouse. It’s all very inspirational and I keep going back to the twenty or so indoor gardens featured. The book is out now online and we’ve seen it in Waterstones and Foyles too.

landscape and garden design in Clapham, London